spat

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See also: Spat, spaț, spať, spát, spät, şpat, and ṣpät

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English spittan, spætan

Verb[edit]

spat

  1. simple past tense and past participle of spit
    There was no sink in the room so we spat out the window.
    If I had known you had a spittoon in the corner I would never have spat on the floor.

Etymology 2[edit]

Of uncertain origin; perhaps related to spit.

Noun[edit]

spat (uncountable)

  1. The spawn of shellfish, especially oysters and similar molluscs.
    • 2005, TVR Pillay & MN Kutty, Aquaculture: Principles and practices, p. 525:
      As spat-fall often occurs in areas away from environments suitable for oyster growing, the collection, transport and sale of oyster spat has developed into a separate industry.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

spat (third-person singular simple present spats, present participle spatting, simple past and past participle spatted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To spawn. Used of shellfish as above.

Etymology 3[edit]

Shortening of spatterdash, from spatter + dash. 1779.

A felt spat
Australian 1970s Holden Kingswood with spats

Noun[edit]

spat (plural spats)

  1. A covering or decorative covering worn over a shoe.
  2. (automotive) (UK, Australia) A piece of bodywork that covers the upper portions of the rear tyres of a car.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

1804. American English, unknown origin.

Noun[edit]

spat (plural spats)

  1. a brief argument, falling out, quarrel
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

spat (third-person singular simple present spats, present participle spatting, simple past and past participle spatted)

  1. to quarrel or argue briefly
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Smart to this entry?)
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Attested from 1823.

Noun[edit]

spat (plural spats)

  1. A light blow with something flat.

Verb[edit]

spat (third-person singular simple present spats, present participle spatting, simple past and past participle spatted)

  1. (transitive and intransitive) To strike with a spattering sound.
    • 1922, B. M. Bower, The Trail of the White Mule, ch. 3:
      He felt the wind of a second bullet that spatted against a boulder near Barney.
    • 2007, Nolan Clay, "Co-workers testify about Kelsey's mother," Daily Oklahoman, 13 July, (retrieved 25 Aug. 2009):
      "She mentioned she had spatted Kelsey on her diaper with a hairbrush," said Mildred Johnson, a co-worker.
  2. (US, dialect) To slap, as with the open hand; to clap together, as the hands.
    • Sylvester Judd
      Little Isabel leaped up and down, spatting her hands.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 6[edit]

Latin spatium (space)

Noun[edit]

spat (plural spats)

  1. An obsolete unit of distance in astronomy (symbol S), equal to one billion kilometres.

Anagrams[edit]


Amis[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

Numeral[edit]

spat

  1. (cardinal) four

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German spat. Compare German Spat and Swedish spatt.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /spat/, [sb̥ad̥]

Noun[edit]

spat c (singular definite spatten, not used in plural form)

  1. spavin (disease of horses characterized by a bony swelling developed on the hock as the result of inflammation of the bones)
  2. få spat – get annoyed or angry

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

spat m

  1. spot, speckle, stain

Verb[edit]

spat

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of spatten
  2. imperative of spatten

Anagrams[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Verb[edit]

spat

  1. Short form of spavati: "Cili Trogir ide spat" = "Cijeli Trogir ide spati" = "The whole City of Trogir goes to sleep"

Taroko[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Atayalic *səpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

Numeral[edit]

spat

  1. (cardinal) four