dash

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dash (plural dashes)

  1. (typography) Any of the following symbols: (figure dash), (en dash), (em dash), or (horizontal bar).
    sometimes dash is also used colloquially to refer to a hyphen or minus sign.
  2. A short run.
  3. A small quantity of a liquid substance; less than 1/8 of a teaspoon.
    Add a dash of vinegar
  4. A dashboard.
  5. One of the two symbols of Morse code.
  6. (Nigeria) A bribe or gratuity.
    • 1992, George B. N. Ayittey, Africa betrayed (page 44)
      The traditional practice of offering gifts or "dash" to chiefs has often been misinterpreted by scholars to provide a cultural explanation for the pervasive incidence of bribery and corruption in modern Africa.
    • 2006, Adiele Eberechukwu Afigbo, The Abolition of the Slave Trade in Southeastern Nigeria, 1885-1950 (page 99)
      Writing in 1924 on a similar situation in Ugep, the political officer, Mr. S. T. Harvey noted: "In the old days there was no specified dowry but merely dashes given to the father-in-law []
    • 2008, Lizzie Williams, Nigeria: The Bradt Travel Guide (page 84)
      The only other times you'll be asked for a dash is from beggars.

Hyponyms[edit]

Hypernyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Punctuation

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

dash (third-person singular simple present dashes, present participle dashing, simple past and past participle dashed)

  1. (intransitive) To run quickly or for a short distance.
    He dashed across the field.
  2. (intransitive, informal) To leave or depart.
    I have to dash now. See you soon.
  3. (transitive) To destroy by striking (against).
    He dashed the bottle against the bar and turned about to fight.
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula Chapter 21
      "`Silence! If you make a sound I shall take him and dash his brains out before your very eyes.'
    • 1912: Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes, Chapter 4
      Kala was the youngest mate of a male called Tublat, meaning broken nose, and the child she had seen dashed to death was her first; for she was but nine or ten years old.
  4. (transitive) To throw violently.
    The man was dashed from the vehicle during the accident.
    • Francis Bacon
      If you dash a stone against a stone in the bottom of the water, it maketh a sound.
  5. (transitive) To sprinkle; to splatter.
    • Thomson
      On each hand the gushing waters play, / And down the rough cascade all dashing fall.
  6. (transitive, of hopes or dreams) To ruin; to destroy.
    Her hopes were dashed when she saw the damage.
    • 2011 September 13, Sam Lyon, “Borussia Dortmund 1 - 1 Arsenal”, BBC:
      Arsenal's hopes of starting their Champions League campaign with an away win were dashed when substitute Ivan Perisic's superb late volley rescued a point for Borussia Dortmund.
  7. (transitive) To dishearten; to sadden.
    Her thoughts were dashed to melancholy.
  8. (transitive) To complete hastily, usually with down or off.
    He dashed down his eggs, she dashed off her homework
  9. To draw quickly; jot.
    • 1922, Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room Chapter 1
      "Scarborough," Mrs. Flanders wrote on the envelope, and dashed a bold line beneath; it was her native town; the hub of the universe.
  10. To throw in or on in a rapid, careless manner; to mix, reduce, or adulterate, by throwing in something of an inferior quality; to overspread partially; to bespatter; to touch here and there.
    to dash wine with water; to dash paint upon a picture
    • Addison
      I take care to dash the character with such particular circumstance as may prevent ill-natured applications.
    • Tennyson
      The very source and fount of day / Is dashed with wandering isles of night.

Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

dash

  1. (euphemistic) Damn!

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *dauša, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeusóm (compare English deer, Lithuanian daũsos ‘upper air; heaven’).

Noun[edit]

dash m (indefinite plural desh)

  1. ram (male sheep)
Related terms[edit]

Norwegian[edit]

Noun[edit]

dash

  1. dash