wig

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See also: WIG and wig-

English[edit]

Colorful wigs.

Etymology[edit]

Shortening of periwig, itself an alteration of French perruque.

Pronunciation[edit]

Rhymes: -ɪɡ

Noun[edit]

wig (plural wigs)

  1. A head of real or synthetic hair worn on the head to disguise baldness; for cultural or religious reasons; for fashion; or by actors to help them better resemble the character they are portraying.
  2. (dated, among fishermen) An old seal.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

wig (third-person singular simple present wigs, present participle wigging, simple past and past participle wigged)

  1. To put on a wig; to provide with a wig (especially of an actor etc.).
  2. (colloquial) To upbraid, reprimand.
  3. (colloquial) To become very excitable or emotional; to lose control of one's emotions.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch wig.

Noun[edit]

wig (plural wîe)

  1. wedge
  2. quoin

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wig m, f (plural wiggen, diminutive wiggetje n)

  1. wedge

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

wig

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐌹𐌲

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wīgą, from Proto-Indo-European *weik-. Cognate with Old Frisian wig, Old Saxon wig, Old High German wīc, Old Norse víg. The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin vincō, Welsh gwychr, Russian век (vek), Lithuanian veĩkti.

Noun[edit]

wīġ n

  1. war, battle
    Oft ic wig seo, frecne feohtan: often I see war, brave men fighting. (AS Riddles)
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Variant of weoh.

Noun[edit]

wīġ m

  1. idol
Derived terms[edit]

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wīgą, from Proto-Indo-European *weik-. Cognate with Old Frisian wig, Old English wig, Old High German wīc, Old Norse víg. The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin vincō, Welsh gwychr, Russian век (vek), Lithuanian veĩkti.

Noun[edit]

wīg n

  1. war, battle
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wigją, from *weganą (to carry). Cognate with Old English wicg, Old Norse vigg.

Noun[edit]

wig n

  1. horse, steed
Declension[edit]