माणूस

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Marathi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Marathi माणुस (māṇusa), from Maharastri Prakrit 𑀫𑀸𑀡𑀼𑀲 (māṇusa), from Sanskrit मनुष्य (manuṣya). Related to Old Marathi मानुस (mānusa).

Noun[edit]

माणूस (māṇūsn

  1. human being
  2. man

Declension[edit]

Declension of माणूस (māṇūs)
direct
singular
माणूस
māṇūs
direct
plural
माणसे, माणसं
māṇse, māṇsa
singular plural
nominative माणूस
māṇūs
माणसे, माणसं
māṇse, māṇsa
oblique माणसा-
māṇsā-
माणसां-
māṇsāN-
dative माणसाला
māṇsālā
माणसांना
māṇsāNnā
ergative माणसाने
māṇsāne
माणसांनी
māṇsāNni
instrumental माणसाशी
māṇsāśi
माणसांशी
māṇsāNśi
locative माणसात
māṇsāt
माणसांत
māṇsāNt
vocative माणसा
māṇsā
माणसांनो
māṇsāNno
Oblique Note: The oblique case precedes all postpositions.
There is no space between the stem and the postposition.
Dative Note: -स (-sa) is archaic. -ते (-te) is limited to literary usage.
Locative Note: -त (-ta) is a postposition.
Genitive declension of माणूस
masculine object feminine object neuter object oblique
singular plural singular plural singular* plural
singular subject माणसाचा
māṇsāċā
माणसाचे
māṇsāce
माणसाची
māṇsāci
माणसाच्या
māṇsāca
माणसाचे, माणसाचं
māṇsāce, māṇsāċa
माणसाची
māṇsāci
माणसाच्या
māṇsāca
plural subject माणसांचा
māṇsāNċā
माणसांचे
māṇsāNce
माणसांची
māṇsāNci
माणसांच्या
māṇsāNca
माणसांचे, माणसांचं
māṇsāNce, māṇsāNċa
माणसांची
māṇsāNci
माणसांच्या
māṇsāNca
* Note: Word-final (e) in neuter words is alternatively written with the anusvara and pronounced as (a).
Oblique Note: For most postpostions, the oblique genitive can be optionally inserted between the stem and the postposition.

References[edit]

  • James Thomas Molesworth (1857), “माणूस”, in A dictionary, Marathi and English, Bombay: Printed for government at the Bombay Education Society's Press
  • Shankar Gopal Tulpule and Anne Feldhau (1999), “manuṣya”, in A Dictionary of Old Marathi, Mumbai: Popular Prakashan
  • Turner, Ralph Lilley (1969–1985), “māˊnuṣa (10049)”, in A Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages, London: Oxford University Press