Achab

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English[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Achab

  1. (possibly dated, now less commonly used by native speakers) Alternative form of Ahab.
    • 1808, Charles Thomson, The Old Covenant, Commonly Called Old Testament; translated from the Septuagint, Jane Aitken (publ.), IV Kings (II Kings) VIII, 26.
      And he walked in the way of Achab and did what was evil in the sight of the Lord, like the house of Achab.
    • 1857, The Holy Bible Translated from the Latin Vulgate, James Duffy (publ.), III Kings (I Kings) XXI, 2, page 260.
      And Achab spoke to Naboth, saying: Give me thy vineyard, that I may make me a garden of herbs, because it is nigh, and joining to my house, and I will give thee for it a better vineyard; or if thou think it more convenient for thee, I will give thee the worth of it in money.
    • 1875, Liévin de Hamme (OFM), Guide to the Holy Places and Historical Sites in the Holy Land, C. Poelman (publ.), page 407.
      Achab called on all the prophets of Baal to prophesy, and they were unanimous in saying he would be victorious.
    • 1995, Fabrizio Lomonaco, "Huguenot Critical Theory and "Ius Maiestatis" in Huber and Althusius", in John Christian Laursen (ed.), New Essays on the Political Thought of the Huguenots of the Refuge, E. J. Brill (publ.), page 180.
      Achab, king of Samaria, was punished by God for being possessed unjustly of the vineyard of Naboth (Kings III, 21), but was still allowed under the constitution to commit an iniquitous act: []
    • 2007, Yechezkel Hirshman, One Above and Seven Below: A Consumer's Guide to Orthodox Judaism from the Perspective of the Chareidim, Mazo Publishers, page 107.
      The Talmud in Tractate Sandhedrin lists King Achab as one of three kings who have forfeited their share in the World to Come for the sin of proliferating idolatry in the extreme.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch achab, from Latin Achab, from Ancient Greek Ἀχαάβ (Akhaáb), from Biblical Hebrew אַחְאָב(ʼAḥʼāḇ, uncle).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈaː.xɑp/
  • Hyphenation: Achab

Proper noun[edit]

Achab m

  1. Ahab (historical king of Israel in Samaria, Biblical figure)

French[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Achab ?

  1. Ahab (biblical character)

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Achab, from Ancient Greek Ἀχαάβ (Akhaáb), from Hebrew אַחְאָב‎.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Achab

  1. Ahab (Biblical character)

Descendants[edit]

  • English: Ahab, Achab