Beatrice

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See also: Béatrice

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Either 1) from the Latin Beatrix, name of early Christian saints, from beatrix ‎(she who makes happy), or 2) from viatrix ‎(“female wayfarer, traveller”), influenced by beata.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbiːətɹɪs/, /ˈbiːtɹɪs/

Proper noun[edit]

Beatrice

  1. A female given name.
    • 1600, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act II:Scene II:
      I, with your two helps, will so practise on Benedick that , in despite of his quick wit and his queasy stomach, he shall fall in love with Beatrice.
    • 1797 William Roscoe, The Life of Lorenzo di Medici, London 1797, Chapter II:
      Petrarca had his Laura, and Dante his Beatrice, but Lorenzo has studiously concealed the name of the sovereign of his affections.
    • 2001 Anne Tyler, Alfred A. Knopf 2001, Back When We Were Grownups, ISBN 0375412530, page 132:
      "Seventeen years old - a senior in high school. Beatrice, her name is."
      Beatrice! Rebecca was struck dumb with admiration. Beatrice would be a female version of Tristram. Rebecca pictured her in a modest muslin dress from the nineteeth century, although she knew that was unlikely.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Used in the Middle Ages and once again popular around 1900.

Translations[edit]


German[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Beatrice

  1. A female given name, Italian and English form of Beatrix.

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Beatrice f

  1. A female given name, equivalent of English Beatrice.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

Beātrīce

  1. ablative singular of Beātrīx

Swedish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Beatrice

  1. A female given name of Latin origin, used since the 19th century.