Beowulf

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Old English Bēowulf.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbeɪoʊwʊlf/, /ˈbeɪəwʊlf/

Proper noun[edit]

Beowulf

  1. An Old English epic poem written circa 1025.
    John Gardner’s retelling of Beowulf is titled Grendel.
  2. (poetic) An Anglo-Saxon personal name, usually with reference to the hero of the poem, or to the poem itself.
    Beowulf is as great a hero as Sigmund.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Origin uncertain, perhaps from bēo (bee) +‎ wulf (wolf), literally “bee-hunter”, used as a kenning for “bear” or “woodpecker”.[1][2][3] Compare also the alternative form Beadowulf, from beadu (battle) +‎ wulf, which may be the original.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbe͜oːˌwulf/, [ˈbe͜oːˌwuɫf]

Proper noun[edit]

Bēowulf m

  1. (poetic) Beowulf

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Traditions, Superstitions, and Folklore, (chiefly Lancashire and the North of England: ) Their Affinity to Others in Widely-distributed Localities; Their Eastern Origin and Mythical Significance by Charles Hardwick, 1872.
  2. ^ Curiosities of Indo-European Tradition and Folk-lore by Walter Keating Kelly, 1863.
  3. ^ The Saxons in England: A History of the English Commonwealth Till the Period of the Norman Conquest by John Mitchell Kemble, 1849.