Cynic

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See also: cynic

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Originated 1540–50 from Latin Cynicus (cynic philosopher), from Ancient Greek Κυνικός (Kynikós) (literally doglike, currish), from κύων (dog) + -ικός; see Proto-Indo-European *kwon-.

The word may have first been applied to Cynics because of the nickname κύων kuōn (dog) given to Diogenes of Sinope, the prototypical Cynic.

Proper noun[edit]

Cynic (plural Cynics)

  1. A member of a sect of Ancient Greek philosophers who believed virtue to be the only good and self-control to be the only means of achieving virtue.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Cynic (not comparable)

  1. Of or relating to the Cynics.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • Cynic” in The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.

Anagrams[edit]