Talk:abroad

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What's the difference between

abroad and overseas

Beyond the borders vs. beyond the sea. --Florian Blaschke 16:29, 7 February 2011 (UTC)
Right. For a citizen of the United States (living in, say, New York) Canada is abroad, but not overseas. - -sche (discuss) 18:58, 16 March 2012 (UTC)

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As noun. It is apparently only used in this sense in the term near abroad, which is one calque of a post-Soviet Russian term, referring to now-independent countries that were formerly part of the Soviet Union. Is it used as a noun in any other collocation? DCDuring TALK 21:46, 5 September 2011 (UTC)

I think it might be possible to find enough hits for this to qualify (as non-standard), for example
  • "I am a xenophiliac; I love abroad" (The parliamentary debates (Hansard).: House of Lords official report)
  • "I am not, however, a xeno- phobe: obviously, abroad has some good ideas — arranged marriages, violent revolutions and so on." (New statesman society, Volumes 3-4)

Fugyoo 06:10, 6 September 2011 (UTC)

And apparently King George V is known for saying "Aboard? I hate abroad" Fugyoo 06:12, 6 September 2011 (UTC)
What, when the stationmaster said, "All aboard"? The character of Uncle Matthew in Nancy Mitford's Love in a Cold Climate said, "Abroad is unutterably bloody and all foreigners are fiends", which is as much of a noun use of an adverb as "Today is a good day to die". —Angr 06:54, 6 September 2011 (UTC)
"Used abroads" seems to be a category referred to in philately. — Pingkudimmi 07:01, 6 September 2011 (UTC)
It could come down to analysis as well; is "go abroad" different to "go home". Do we have an adverb sense of home? Mglovesfun (talk) 08:38, 6 September 2011 (UTC)
Passed. - -sche (discuss) 03:10, 10 March 2012 (UTC)