User talk:Angr

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RE: Galician cu[edit]

Sorry. You are right. I am more careful with copy and paste. Regards and thanks. --Vivaelcelta (talk) 11:07, 12 April 2014 (UTC)

It may be. But I am not sure, because I don't know phonetic. Regards --Vivaelcelta (talk) 11:14, 12 April 2014 (UTC)
Yes, but sometimes the words choose, like oso and óso. But in this case it must be well. --Vivaelcelta (talk) 11:20, 12 April 2014 (UTC)

Problem[edit]

In this Spanish entry hijo de puta, appears plural and feminine form. But in this Galician fillo de puta, entry doesn't appear the feminine form. Can you fix? Regards and thanks. --Vivaelcelta (talk) 12:32, 12 April 2014 (UTC)

No, I can't, sorry. The difference is that {{es-noun}} allows you to specify a feminine equivalent, but {{gl-noun}} doesn't. And I don't know how to fix that. But you can still add filla de puta manually to a ====Coordinate terms==== subsection on the fillo de puta page. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 12:36, 12 April 2014 (UTC)
I just added the f= parameter. It should be working now. — Ungoliant (falai) 12:43, 12 April 2014 (UTC)

autopase[edit]

How is into English the Spanish word autopase? It is a pass that gives and receives the same player ignoring the opposing to him obstructs. Regards. --Vivaelcelta (talk) 22:01, 16 April 2014 (UTC)

Sorry, I don't know anything at all about soccer. I did find Google hits for the word self-pass, but I don't know if that's the same thing as Spanish autopase. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 05:02, 18 April 2014 (UTC)

Spanish accentuation[edit]

Why is reloj accented on the last syllable? And why can the final j be not pronounced? Is there a rule? --kc_kennylau (talk) 15:02, 18 April 2014 (UTC)

Reloj is accented on the last syllable because the spelling rule in Spanish is that words ending in a consonant letter other than n and s are stressed on the last syllable (e.g. verdad, niñez). The j can be silent because in many varieties of Spanish, j is pronounced /h/ rather than /x/, and in a whole lot of languages (including English) /h/ never appears at the end of a word. And I guess even in the varieties of Spanish where j is pronounced /x/, there are so few words ending in /x/ (or indeed any non-coronal consonant) that it feels weird to Spanish speakers to say /reˈlox/, so they drop the /x/ and and say /reˈlo/. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 16:06, 18 April 2014 (UTC)
Any other consonants causing drop at word-final? --kc_kennylau (talk) 02:05, 19 April 2014 (UTC)