Talk:taste like chicken

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Tastes like chicken[edit]

Does this "meat" our CFI? SemperBlotto 17:12, 19 April 2007 (UTC)

Oops - should have probably gone to rfv. SemperBlotto 17:14, 19 April 2007 (UTC)
No, it's already sourced. "Does this meet CFI" is an RFD question.
Keep the references and replace the rest with an appropriate definition. The humor derives from the notion that chicken doesn't taste like much of anything. I would guess that a literal translation doesn't make as much sense in a culture that eats more dark meat. It's for similar reasons that jokes generally do not translate. Without that idiomatic understanding there is no value to the phrase. DAVilla 07:04, 21 April 2007 (UTC)
i reckon a proper entry could hatch from this one. --Keene 10:51, 24 April 2007 (UTC)


RFD discussion: December 2018[edit]

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I don't think the previous RFD (Talk:taste like chicken) explored this adequately! Things tasting like chicken is a mainstay of cultural comedy, maybe, but it's the idea that is important, not the wording. This phrase is still pure SoP. (Perhaps comparable: there is also a cultural idea that nerds live in their mothers' basements, but that wouldn't justify an entry for live in one's mother's basement.) Equinox 15:19, 30 December 2018 (UTC)

Delete. People use it literally before knowing it is idiomatic. It’s just the answer one gives on the question how some meat tastes, comparing it with a more known meat. It ends up being humourous when the taste cannot be described well then, or explained why one eats snakes when one could eat just chicken. Fay Freak (talk) 16:02, 30 December 2018 (UTC)
Delete. Even in those cases where the intention is humorous, the meaning is still the literal one.  --Lambiam 17:00, 30 December 2018 (UTC)
Delete. The definition reads like the malformed offspring of a usage note and an etymology, with no actual meaning. As an amateur ethnobiologist who has read a great deal on the subject, I can attest that this is a serious cliché in popular writing on wild foods, the animal counterpart to "tastes like spinach/potatoes when boiled" for plant foods. Appropriating clichés for humorous purposes is fairly common- but that doesn't make it lexical.
If anything, this might be the non-variant part of a snowclone ("X tastes like chicken"), but I don't think there's a strong enough lexical element to justify even that. Chuck Entz (talk) 20:41, 30 December 2018 (UTC)
Delete. ←₰-→ Lingo Bingo Dingo (talk) 13:44, 31 December 2018 (UTC)