Tiggerish

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Tigger +‎ -ish, from the nature of the fictional character Tigger in works about Winnie-the-Pooh by the English author A. A. Milne (1882–1956).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Tiggerish (comparative more Tiggerish, superlative most Tiggerish)

  1. (Britain) (Excessively) cheerful and exuberant; bouncy.
    Synonyms: energetic, lively
    • 1920, Burns Mantle, The Best Plays of 1919–1920: And the Year Book of the Drama in America (The Burns Mantle Yearbook), Boston, Mass.: Small, Maynard & Company, OCLC 9212429, page 431:
      In the crucial scene of third-degree examination the wife of the accused turns on the magistrate and berates him with tiggerish ferocity and later stabs him to his death by way of reprisal.
    • 1996, New Statesman, volume 125, London: New Statesman Ltd., ISSN 1364-7431, OCLC 185357433, page 25, column 2:
      And still there is about him a hint of the ingenu; a Tiggerish quality of enthusiasm for the [Tony] Blair vision that has nothing to do with fawning loyalism.
    • 2009, Will King, “Chapter New: You”, in How to Build a Great Business in Tough Times: The King of Shaves Story, London: Headline Business Plus, →ISBN:
      If you want to kill inertia and overcome the hard part of starting up, in your own way you've got to develop Tiggerish characteristics. You need a relentless, boundless optimistic enthusiasm for what can be achieved although it is yet to happen []
    • 2010, Iain Hollingshead, chapter 2, in Beta Male: Four Friends, Three Assumed Identities, Two Weddings and One Very Dangerous Bet, London; New York, N.Y.: Duckworth Overlook, →ISBN:
      Everyone likes Sam – often despite themselves – because he makes them feel likeable, because they want him to like them back, because he exudes such a Tiggerish enthusiasm for life. Quite simply, he makes life more interesting.
    • 2011 May 6, Katharine Viner, “Adam Curtis: Have computers taken away our power?”, in The Guardian[1], London, archived from the original on 10 August 2017:
      Perhaps because of these emotionally engaging techniques, [Adam] Curtis inspires cultish devotion, and not just from viewers – he has won six Baftas. A former politics tutor at Oxford, and a Tiggerish man of 55, it's surprising to learn that he began his career in TV working on the zany magazine show That's Life! []

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