-ish

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See also: ish and Ish

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English -ish, -isch, from Old English -isc (-ish, suffix), from Proto-Germanic *-iskaz (-ish), from Proto-Indo-European *-iskos. Cognate with Dutch and German -isch, Norwegian and Danish -isk, Lithuanian -iškas, and Ancient Greek diminutive suffix -ισκος (-iskos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ish

  1. (appended to many kinds of words) Typical or similar to.
    Her face had a girlish charm.
    • 1859, Harriet Parr (as Holme Lee), Against Wind and Tide, volume 1, p. 273:
      [] ; for she had recently developed a magpie[-]ish tendency to appropriate and conceal trifling matters; []
  2. (appended to adjectives) Somewhat.
    Her face had a greenish tinge.
  3. (appended to numbers, especially times and ages) About, approximately.
    We arrived at tennish or We arrived tennish. (Sometime around ten.)
    I couldn't tell his precise age, but he was fiftyish.
  4. (appended to roots denoting names of nations or regions) Of a nationality, place, language or similar association with something.
    British, Cornish, Danish, English, Finnish, Irish, Kentish, Scottish, Spanish, Swedish etc.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]


Manx[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-ish

  1. -ish (language)

Usage notes[edit]

  • Added to names of places or peoples to denote the language spoken in that place or by that people.

Suffix[edit]

-ish

  1. -self (emphatic)

Usage notes[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Related terms[edit]