-some

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See also: some

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English -some, -som, -sum, from Old English -sum (same as; -some), from Proto-Germanic *-samaz, from Proto-Germanic *samaz (same). Akin to Saterland Frisian -soam (-some), West Frisian -sum (-some), Dutch -zaam (-some), German Low German -saam (-some), German -sam (-some), Icelandic -samur (-some), Gothic -𐍃𐌰𐌼𐍃 (-sams), -𐍃𐌰𐌼𐌰 (-sama). Cognate with Albanian -shëm (-some). More at same.

Suffix[edit]

-some

  1. Characterized by some specific condition or quality.
    • 2012, Tom Sandham, World's Best Cocktails:
      Elsewhere the blingsome silver-beveled mirrors, butterfly and lotus blossom motifs, and the occasional chaise longue make the opulence a touch on the show-off side for me, but the expenses were obviously 5-star and it's undoubtedly bespoke.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English -some, from a specialized use of Old English sum (some, one) coming after a genitive plural (e.g. hē wæs fēowertiga sum --"he was one of forty", literally "he was forties' some[one]"; sixa sum --"one of six, sixsome").

Suffix[edit]

-some

  1. Used to form a word indicating a group with a certain small number of members
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Ancient Greek σῶμα (sôma, body).

Suffix[edit]

-some

  1. a body

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From previous sense “body” (from Ancient Greek σῶμα (sôma, body)), by analogy with chromosome.

Suffix[edit]

-some

  1. a chromosome

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

From some in its "approximately" sense; more at some § Etymology.

Suffix[edit]

-some

  1. Plus some indeterminate fraction not amounting to the next higher round number or significant digit; and change; -odd.
    twenty-some identifiable factors affecting the outcome
    one-hundred-and-fifty-some spectators in the bleachers

Anagrams[edit]