-yn

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: yn, YN, yN, yn-, and ŷn

Danish[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-yn

  1. (organic chemistry) -yne

Dutch[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-yn

  1. (organic chemistry) -yne

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-yn

  1. Suffix variant for the illative singular, see -Vn.

Lithuanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Perhaps related to the illiative case? See: "The origin of the Lithuanian illative" by Eugen Hill, Specht Litauische Mundarten Vol 2. p 256 footnote 3, and other sources.”

Suffix[edit]

-yn

  1. Forms adverbs that denote a change toward a certain condition.
    mažas + -yn = mažyn

Usage notes[edit]

Adverbs formed from this suffix are often used with the verb eiti (to go), e.g. eina blogyn, it is getting worse. Reduplication is also common for emphasis, e.g. didyn ir didyn, bigger and bigger.

Kalindra (2011) compares -yn to -ways, -ward, and -wise in English, although -yn is not restricted to directions. Alternatively, one may think of it as a comparative suffix like -er, which is usually how derived adverbs would be translated into English (as in the preceding examples), but this is distinct from the comparative degree of adverbs in Lithuanian.

References[edit]

  • Vytautas Ambrazas (2006), “6. Adverb”, in Lithuanian Grammar, 2nd revised edition, pages 380–381
  • Rimantas Kalindra (2011), “Some Lexical, Morphological and Syntactical Similarities and Differencies in Lithuanian, Italian and English Languages”, in Studies About Languages, DOI:10.5755/J01.SAL.0.18.406, pages 27–37

Manx[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Cognate to Irish -anna, Scottish Gaelic -an.

Suffix[edit]

-yn

  1. Pluralisation suffix, similar to English -s

Etymology 2[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-yn

  1. -self (emphatic)
Related terms[edit]

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh -yn, from Proto-Brythonic *-ɨnn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-yn m (feminine -en)

  1. Used to form the singulative of certain words.
    winwns (onions) + ‎-yn → ‎winwnsyn (onion)
    plant (children) + ‎-yn → ‎plentyn (child)
    dillad (clothes) + ‎-yn → ‎dilledyn (item of clothing, piece of clothing)
  2. Used to form certain singular words.
    diferu (to drop, to drip) + ‎-yn → ‎diferyn (drop, drip)
    gwair (grass) + ‎-yn → ‎gweiryn (blade of grass)
    planhigion (plants) + ‎-yn → ‎planhigyn (plant)
  3. diminutive suffix
    llyfr (book) + ‎-yn → ‎llyfryn (booklet)
    arf (weapon, tool) + ‎-yn → ‎erfyn (tool, instrument)
    clwt (rag) + ‎-yn → ‎clwtyn ((little) rag)
  4. male or masculine person or creature
    cardota (to beg) + ‎-yn → ‎cardotyn (beggar)
    meddw (drunk) + ‎-yn → ‎meddwyn (drunkard)
    crwydro (to wander) + ‎-yn → ‎crwydryn (vagrant)
  5. object, item, thing
    gwydr (glass) + ‎-yn → ‎gwydryn ((drinking) glass)
    newid (change) + ‎-yn → ‎newidyn (variable)
    misol (monthly) + ‎-yn → ‎misolyn (monthly (periodical))
    echdynnu (to extract) + ‎-yn → ‎echdynnyn (extract)

Usage notes[edit]

-yn causes i-affection of internal vowels.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “-yn”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies