altitudo

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Esperanto[edit]

Esperanto Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eo

Etymology[edit]

Derived from Latin altitūdō, from altus (high, lofty) + -tūdō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): [altiˈtudo]
  • Rhymes: -udo
  • Hyphenation: al‧ti‧tu‧do

Noun[edit]

altitudo (uncountable, accusative altitudon)

  1. absolute height
  2. (astronomy) distance measured angularly of a heavenly body

Derived terms[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin altitūdō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /altiˈtudo/
  • Rhymes: -do, -o
  • Hyphenation: al‧ti‧tu‧do

Noun[edit]

altitudo (first-person possessive altitudoku, second-person possessive altitudomu, third-person possessive altitudonya)

  1. altitude:
    1. (physics) the absolute height of a location, usually measured from sea level.
    2. (astronomy) the angular distance of a heavenly body above our Earth's horizon.

Alternative forms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From altus (high, lofty) +‎ -tūdō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

altitūdō f (genitive altitūdinis); third declension

  1. height (distance from bottom to top)
  2. depth
  3. (figuratively) spiritual or emotional depth

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative altitūdō altitūdinēs
Genitive altitūdinis altitūdinum
Dative altitūdinī altitūdinibus
Accusative altitūdinem altitūdinēs
Ablative altitūdine altitūdinibus
Vocative altitūdō altitūdinēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • altitudo”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • altitudo”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • altitudo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • altitudo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the exalted strain of the speech: elatio atque altitudo orationis