ancilla

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ancilla (maid, slave-girl).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ancilla (plural ancillae)

  1. A maid.
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p. 306:
      ‘And pass me that towel,’ added Ada, but the ancilla was picking up coins she had dropped in her haste []
  2. An auxiliary or accessory
    • 2009 January 23, Ryo Okamoto et al., “An Entanglement Filter”, in Science[1], volume 323, number 5913, DOI:10.1126/science.1167182:
      The filter achieves this two-qubit filtering effect by using two ancilla photons as probes that detect whether or not the two input photons are in the desired states.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From ancula (maid) +‎ -lus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ancilla f (genitive ancillae); first declension

  1. maid, slave-girl
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Lucas.1.38
      dixit autem Maria ecce ancilla Domini fiat mihi secundum verbum tuum
      And Mary said, Behold the handmaid of the Lord. Let it be to me according to your word.

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative ancilla ancillae
genitive ancillae ancillārum
dative ancillae ancillīs
accusative ancillam ancillās
ablative ancillā ancillīs
vocative ancilla ancillae

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • ancilla in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ancilla in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “ancilla”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • ancilla” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • ancilla in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ancilla in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin