antielite

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

anti- +‎ elite

Alternative forms[edit]

anti-elite

Adjective[edit]

antielite (comparative more antielite, superlative most antielite)

  1. (sociology) Opposing an elite or elitism.
    • 1978, Arthur J. Lerman, Taiwan's politics: the provincial assemblyman's world, page 103:
      Moreover , according to informants , this core of antielite opposition is not only limited but also often split.
    • 2000, Chip Berlet, ‎Matthew Nemiroff Lyons, Right-wing Populism in America: Too Close for Comfort, →ISBN, page 10:
      Antielite conspiracism has deep roots in U.S. political culture.
    • 2010, Wale Adebanwi, ‎Ebenezer Obadare, Encountering the Nigerian State, page 140:
      This chapter argues that the antielite, prosubaltern activities of the OPC under Gani Adams should be seen as the latest in a series of subaltern generated actions aimed at questioning the dynamics of elite politics within Yorubaland and Nigeria in general.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

antielite (plural antielites)

  1. One who is antielite; a proponent of antielitism.
    • 1976, Leon N. Lindberg, Politics and the future of industrial society, page 170:
      When, in contrast, elites are only minimally attached to established economic and sociopolitical patterns or they are deeply divided over policy goals, some processes may atrophy (such as state services or economic productivity) and /or the system may become vulnerable to the ideological attacks of antielites who seek to displace the system altogether.
    • 1981, Johan Galtung, The True Worlds: A Transnational Experience, →ISBN, page 224:
      The model best known so far is the model of counterelites and antielites exercising pressure on their respective governments.
    • 1986, The Hispanic American historical review, page 448:
      The book demonstrates the relationships of Marxism to other philosophies and to populist and reform movements, comments on the compatibility of individual liberty and central authority; indicates how the rise of antielites has reflected a consciousness of problems requiring new political solutions; and notes to what extent Latin American Marxists have contributed to political and social change.

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From anti- +‎ elite.

Adjective[edit]

antielite (invariable, comparable)

  1. (sociology) antielitist (opposed to elitism)

Synonyms[edit]