aquila

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Aquila and Áquila

Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

aquila (plural aquilas)

  1. eagle

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin aquila.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈa.kwi.la/
  • Rhymes: -akwila
  • Hyphenation: à‧qui‧la

Noun[edit]

aquila f (plural aquile)

  1. eagle
  2. (heraldry) eagle

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

aquila (eagle)

Etymology[edit]

Unknown origin, but probably related to aquilus (blackish, the color of darkness)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aquila f (genitive aquilae); first declension

  1. eagle
  2. the standard (of an eagle) carried by a Roman legion

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative aquila aquilae
Genitive aquilae aquilārum
Dative aquilae aquilīs
Accusative aquilam aquilās
Ablative aquilā aquilīs
Vocative aquila aquilae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Balkan Romance:
    • Romanian: aceră
  • Italo-Romance:

Adjective[edit]

aquila

  1. inflection of aquilus:
    1. nominative/vocative feminine singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter plural

Adjective[edit]

aquilā

  1. ablative feminine singular of aquilus

References[edit]

  • aquila”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • aquila”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aquila in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • aquila in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • aquila”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aquila”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • aquila”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin