awrath

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See also: Awrath

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the Old English ġewrāþian; equivalent to the English a- +‎ wrath.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

awrath (third-person singular simple present *awraths, present participle *awrathing, simple past *awrathed, past participle awrathed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive and reflexive) Anger; enrage.
    • 1916, Casper Salathiel Yost and Pearl Lenore Pollard Curran, Patience Worth: A Psychic Mystery, H. Holt and Company, page 157:
      Telka arounded and awrathed be like unto a thunder-storm, []
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

awrath

  1. Wrathful; incensed; enraged; irate.
    • 1862, Duffy’s Hibernian magazine, volume 2, page 161, “The Flight of the Earls”, lines 1–4
      ‛Tis an old story: Might awrath with right:
      A nation conquered and her shrines o’erthrown;
      Her chieftains flying seaward in the night,
      And not a trumpet of departure blown.
    • 1908, Miguel Zamacoïs (author) and John Nathan Raphael (translator), The Jesters: A Simple Story in Four Acts of Verse, page 22 (Brentano’s)
      Nay, never sneer! Enough! I am awrath today! Give me the gold you owe, or by the saints —
    • ante 1931, Elsdon Best, Māori Religion and Mythology: Being an Account of the Cosmogony, Anthropogeny, Religious Beliefs and Rites, Magic and Folk Lore of the Māori Folk of New Zealand, part 2, page 295 (Te Papa Press; ISBN 1877385069, 9781877385063)
      These are felt in the upper world, where Hine-puia, who personifies volcanoes, is awrath, and who sweeps before her Hine-uku []
    • 1976, Collected Early poems of Ezra Pound, page 34 ISBN 0811208435, Malrin
      But one left me awroth and went in unto thy table. I tarried, till his anger was blown out.
    • 2006, Hugh Cook, The Witchlord and the Weaponmaster, page 491 (Lulu.com; ISBN 9781411685840
      After awhile, Guest Gulkan no longer knew whether he was alive or dead, awake or awrath in nightmare.

Noun[edit]

awrath (uncountable)

  1. wrath
    • 2008, Randal Chase, Making Precious Things Plain: A Book of Mormon Study Guide, page 128 (Cedar Fort; ISBN 1599551306, 9781599551302)
      Moroni expected no positive response, saying, “Ye have once rejected these things, and have fought against the people of the Lord, even so I may expect you will do it again. And now behold, we are prepared to receive you; yea, and except you withdraw your purposes, behold, ye will pull down the awrath of that God whom you have rejected upon you, even to your utter destruction” (v. 8–9).

Etymology 3[edit]

From the Arabic عَوْرَة (ʿawra, imperfection”, “nakedness), from عَوِرَ (ʿawira, to lose an eye).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

awrath (uncountable)

  1. (Islam) Those parts of one’s body which must be covered for decency, the identification of which various according to sect and circumstance (for example, a woman covers different parts around men than around women).
See also[edit]