awrath

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See also: Awrath

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the Old English ġewrāþian; equivalent to the English a- +‎ wrath.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

awrath (third-person singular simple present *awraths, present participle *awrathing, simple past *awrathed, past participle awrathed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive and reflexive) Anger; enrage.
    • 1916: Casper Salathiel Yost and Pearl Lenore Pollard Curran, Patience Worth: A Psychic Mystery, page 157 (H. Holt and Company)
      Telka arounded and awrathed be like unto a thunder-storm, […]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

awrath

  1. Wrathful; incensed; enraged; irate.
    • 1862: Duffy’s Hibernian magazine, volume 2, page 161, “The Flight of the Earls”, lines 1–4
      ‛Tis an old story: Might awrath with right:
       A nation conquered and her shrines o’erthrown;
      Her chieftains flying seaward in the night,
       And not a trumpet of departure blown.
    • 1908: Miguel Zamacoïs [aut.] and John Nathan Raphael [tr.], The Jesters: A Simple Story in Four Acts of Verse, page 22 (Brentano’s)
      Nay, never sneer! Enough! I am awrath today! Give me the gold you owe, or by the saints —
    • ante 1931: Elsdon Best, Māori Religion and Mythology: Being an Account of the Cosmogony, Anthropogeny, Religious Beliefs and Rites, Magic and Folk Lore of the Māori Folk of New Zealand, part 2, page 295 (Te Papa Press; ISBN 1877385069, 9781877385063)
      These are felt in the upper world, where Hine-puia, who personifies volcanoes, is awrath, and who sweeps before her Hine-uku […]
    • 1976: Collected Early poems of Ezra Pound, page 34 (ISBN 0811208435), Malrin
      But one left me awroth and went in unto thy table. I tarried, till his anger was blown out.
    • 2006: Hugh Cook, The Witchlord and the Weaponmaster, page 491 (Lulu.com; ISBN 9781411685840)
      After awhile, Guest Gulkan no longer knew whether he was alive or dead, awake or awrath in nightmare.

Noun[edit]

awrath (uncountable)

  1. wrath
    • 2008: Randal Chase, Making Precious Things Plain: A Book of Mormon Study Guide, page 128 (Cedar Fort; ISBN 1599551306, 9781599551302)
      Moroni expected no positive response, saying, “Ye have once rejected these things, and have fought against the people of the Lord, even so I may expect you will do it again. And now behold, we are prepared to receive you; yea, and except you withdraw your purposes, behold, ye will pull down the awrath of that God whom you have rejected upon you, even to your utter destruction” (v. 8–9).

Etymology 3[edit]

From the Arabic عورة (ʕáwrah, imperfection”, “nakedness), from عور (ʕáwira, to lose an eye).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

awrath (uncountable)

  1. (Islam) Those parts of one’s body which must be covered for decency — the area from the navel to the knee for a man, the entire body apart from the hands and the face for a woman.
    • 1967: Practical Islam, page 86
      'AWRATH' of a male is between the naval and the knee.
      'AWRATH' of a female — is all the parts of the body excepting the face and the hands.
See also[edit]