biopath

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From biopathy.

Noun[edit]

biopath (plural biopaths)

  1. (parapsychology, science fiction) A person with the telepathic ability to manipulate the physiology (e.g. heart rate, breathing or brainwaves) and voluntary motor functions of other people or organisms.
    Coordinate terms: empath, telepath, technopath
    • 1996, Sarah Cant, ‎Ursula Sharma, Complementary and Alternative Medicines: Knowledge in Practice, page 123:
      One biopath revealed masked tuberculosis with 14 of 46 patients, while another biopath only revealed this problem in 1 of 12.
    • 2017, K. Hippolite, The Rocket Girl's Tale, unnumbered page:
      Biopaths like this one were low-rated telepaths whose powers lay in speaking to bodies rather than minds.
    • 2019, Darryl Gopaul, Encyclopedia Library, unnumbered page:
      However, all telepathic biopaths were open to the committee members, who closed their eyes to listen to the sing-song voice of their first alien on planet Orthus.
  2. A practitioner of biopathy (holistic medical practice)
    • 1895 October 26, “Introductory Address”, in JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, volume 25, number 17, page 691:
      We have Osteopaths, biopaths and vitapaths, etc.
    • 1937, League of Nations Publications - Issues 2-9, page 233:
      Speaking generally , owing to ignorance and poverty of the masses as well as due to cross-currents of thought by and through hakims, vaids, homeopaths, chromopaths, “biopaths” ( twelve tissue remedies ) , hydropaths and quacks, collaboration of the population is hardly to be expected.
    • 2014, Helena Öhrström, Messages of Peace from the Pleiades, page 49:
      Then I ́m recommended through a good friend working as a Biopath to use a flower remedy called holly.
    • 2015, Dr Ernst Schrott, ‎Dr J. Ramanuja Raju, ‎Stefan Schrott, Marma Therapy, page 1:
      Gudrun Jonsson, Biopath, Reflexologist and author of Gut Reaction
  3. An adherent of the orgone theory of Wilhelm Reich.
    • 1953, Wilhelm Reich ·, Wilhelm Reich Biographical Material:
      Thus it was the truth , spoken by a biopath in the disguise of a national hero, which led to basic, new answers, to new truths.
    • 1974, Jerome Greenfield, Wilhelm Reich Vs. the U.S.A., page 43:
      I do not .. tell public anything about the burning eyes in a woman body who expected orgastic potency from me the king of orgastic potency in the minds of so many frustrated cranks and biopaths;
    • 1982, Wilhelm Reich, ‎Alexander Sutherland Neill, ‎Beverley R. Placzek, Record of a Friendship, page 254:
      The phantastic thing about it is that in this 20th century it has become a habit of so-called scientists, instead of looking into a microscope and seeing the blue in the bions and the blood corpuscles, instead of putting cancer patients into orgone accumulators and seeing whether it works or not, they run to biopaths in order to listen to opinions about this work, as if natural functions could be judged by opinions.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

biopath (plural biopaths)

  1. Synonym of biopathway
    • 1978, United States. Congress. House. Committee on Science and Technology. Subcommittee on Fossil and Nuclear Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration, Nuclear Waste Management, page 39:
      The natural clays in the earth's crust, for instance, tend to adsorb Pu ions from dilute water streams, locking them away from human biopaths.
    • 2004, Alternative Land Use Systems for Sustainable Production, page 324:
      Thus, the silvipastoral/agroforestry systems are biologically more complex than other biopaths of using land alone through arable farming or sole grass cropping or tree plantations.
    • 2015, Keikhosro Karimi, Lignocellulose-Based Bioproducts, page 40:
      In contrast, biopaths entirely lead to the formation of liquid and gaseous biofuels through fermentation and anaerobic digestion processes.