caduceus

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English[edit]

A caduceus

Etymology[edit]

Via Latin cādūceus, cādūceum, adaptation of Doric Ancient Greek καρύκειον ‎(karúkeion, herald’s wand or staff). This and Attic Greek κηρύκειον ‎(kērúkeion) are derived from κῆρυξ ‎(kêruks, herald, public messenger). Related to κηρύσσω ‎(kērússō, I announce).

Noun[edit]

caduceus ‎(plural caducei)

  1. The official wand carried by a herald in ancient Greece and Rome, specifically the one carried in mythology by Hermes, the messenger of the gods, usually represented with two snakes twined around it.
  2. A symbol () representing a staff with two snakes wrapped around it, used to indicate merchants and messengers, and also sometimes as a symbol of medicine.

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

External links[edit]

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Wikipedia

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cādūceus m ‎(genitive cādūceī); second declension

  1. Alternative form of cādūceum

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative cādūceus cādūceī
genitive cādūceī cādūceōrum
dative cādūceō cādūceīs
accusative cādūceum cādūceōs
ablative cādūceō cādūceīs
vocative cādūcee cādūceī