wand

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See also: Wand

English[edit]

A magic wand
A mascara tube with a wand applicator

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English wand, wond, from Old Norse vǫndr (switch, twig)[1], from Proto-Germanic *wanduz (rod), from Proto-Indo-European *wendʰ- (to turn, twist, wind, braid). Cognate with Icelandic vendi (wand), Danish vånd (wand, switch), German Wand (wall, septum), Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌽𐌳𐌿𐍃 (wandus, rod).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wand (plural wands)

  1. A hand-held narrow rod, usually used for pointing or instructing, or as a traditional emblem of authority.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      Then all of a sudden a number of armed men arranged in companies, and marshalled by officers who held ivory wands in their hands, came running swiftly towards us, having, so far as I could make out, emerged from the face of the precipice like ants from their burrows.
  2. (by extension) An instrument shaped like a wand, such as a curling wand.
  3. A stick or rod used by a magician (a magic wand), conjurer or diviner (divining rod).
    • 1859, George Meredith, The Ordeal of Richard Feverel, Chapter 13:
      Love is that blessed wand which wins the waters from the hardness of the heart.
  4. A stick, branch, or stalk, especially of willow.
  5. A card of a particular suit of the minor arcana in tarot, the wands.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

wand (third-person singular simple present wands, present participle wanding, simple past and past participle wanded)

  1. (transitive) To scan (e.g. a passenger at an airport) with a metal detector.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “wand”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch want, from Proto-Germanic *wanduz (wickerwork; barrier, fence). Cognate with German Wand.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wand m (plural wanden, diminutive wandje n)

  1. wall
  2. face (as in mountain face)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: wand
  • Negerhollands: wand

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wand

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of winden

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *wanduz (mole), from Proto-Indo-European *wendʰ- (to turn, twist, wind, braid).

Noun[edit]

wand f

  1. mole (animal)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From windan.

Verb[edit]

wand

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of windan