Wand

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See also: wand

Central Franconian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • Wank (Ripuarian; now chiefly western dialects)

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German (*)wand, northern variant of want. For the phonetic development compare Hand.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Wand f (plural Wänn or Wäng, diminutive Wändche)

  1. (many dialects) wall

Usage notes[edit]

  • The plural Wänn is used in Moselle Franconian and some southern dialects of Ripuarian. The form Wäng is used in many Ripuarian dialects, including Kölsch.

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German want, from Old High German want, from Proto-Germanic *wandiz (weave; wickerwork; plait; wall), from Proto-Indo-European *wendʰ- (to turn; bend; wind; twist; braid; weave).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Wand f (genitive Wand, plural Wände)

  1. wall, partition
  2. precipice

Usage notes[edit]

  • The words Wand and Mauer are often but not always interchangeable. Even when they are, there is sometimes a preference for one of them:
  • Wand is predominant for all walls that are not made of stone, concrete, or the like.
  • With stone walls, only Mauer is commonly used for freestanding ones.
  • Both words are used for the walls of buildings. Wand is the normal choice, however, when one refers to them as seen from the inside (for example, a painting is typically said to hang an der Wand, "on the wall", rather than an der Mauer).

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Wand in Duden online

Luxembourgish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old High German wint, from Proto-Germanic *windaz.

Noun[edit]

Wand m (plural Wënn)

  1. wind
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old High German want.

Noun[edit]

Wand f (plural Wänn)

  1. (interior) wall
Derived terms[edit]