Hermes

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See also: hermes and Hermès

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From the Ancient Greek Ἑρμῆς (Hermês), itself of disputed meaning and origin, possibly of non-Indo-European substrate or from Proto-Indo-European *ser- (to bind, put together).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Hermes

Hermes

  1. (Greek mythology) The herald and messenger of the gods, and the god of roads, commerce, invention, cunning, and theft.
  2. The Egyptian Thoth, identified with the Greek Hermes.
  3. (astronomy) The planet Mercury when observed as an evening star.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

Hermes (plural Hermae)

  1. (art) A head or bust on a square base, often double-faced.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Ἑρμῆς (Hermês).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Hermes m

  1. Hermes

Czech[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Hermes m

  1. Hermes

Further reading[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Hermes

  1. Hermes (Greek god)

Declension[edit]

Inflection of Hermes (Kotus type 41/vieras, no gradation)
nominative Hermes
genitive Hermeen
partitive Hermestä
illative Hermeeseen
singular plural
nominative Hermes
accusative nom. Hermes
gen. Hermeen
genitive Hermeen
partitive Hermestä
inessive Hermeessä
elative Hermeestä
illative Hermeeseen
adessive Hermeellä
ablative Hermeeltä
allative Hermeelle
essive Hermeenä
translative Hermeeksi
instructive
abessive Hermeettä
comitative

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Ἑρμῆς (Hermês).

Proper noun[edit]

Hermes m

  1. Hermes

German[edit]

German Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia de

Proper noun[edit]

Hermes m

  1. (Greek mythology) Hermes

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Ἑρμῆς (Hermês).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Hermēs m (variously declined, genitive Hermae or Hermētis); first declension, third declension

  1. Hermes.
  2. A rectangular pillar or pedestal bearing a bust; a herm.
  3. Hermes Trismegistus.

Declension[edit]

The first declension paradigm applies to all senses. The third declension paradigm is an exception that comes from Medieval Latin and is principally used to decline the name of Hermes Trismegistus when there is a wish to congrue with established Medieval Latin derivations such as hermeticus; but note that the figure of Hermes Trismegistus dates back to Antiquity, and that the existence of this special grammatical treatment has no parallel in Greek.

First declension, masculine Greek type with nominative singular in -ēs.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative Hermēs Hermae
Genitive Hermae Hermārum
Dative Hermae Hermīs
Accusative Hermēn Hermās
Ablative Hermē Hermīs
Vocative Hermē Hermae

Third declension.

Case Singular
Nominative Hermēs
Genitive Hermētis
Dative Hermētī
Accusative Hermētem
Ablative Hermēte
Vocative Hermēs

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈxɛr.mɛs/
  • (file)

Proper noun[edit]

Hermes m

  1. (Greek mythology) Hermes

Declension[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
Hermes

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Ἑρμῆς (Hermês), itself of unknown meaning and origin.

Noun[edit]

Hermes m

  1. (Greek mythology) Hermes (messenger of the gods)
  2. A male given name

See also[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Ἑρμῆς (Hermês).

Proper noun[edit]

Hermes m

  1. Hermes