calumet

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a Norman variant of Old French chalumeau (imported to Canada with Norman colonists), from Latin calamellus, diminutive of calamus (reed), from Ancient Greek κάλαμος (kálamos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

calumet (plural calumets)

  1. A clay tobacco-pipe used by American Indians, especially as a symbol of truce or peace.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      THE CALUMET OF PEACE. He offered a cigarette to the professor and took one himself.
    • 2010, William Ingraham Kip, The Early Jesuit Missions in North America[1], page 283:
      When the chief has directed them to approach, they advance; those who have the calumets, chant and dance with much agility, now turning around each other, and now presenting themselves in front, but always with violent movements and extraordinary contortions.

Synonyms[edit]