cantore

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Dutch kantoor and its obsolete spelling cantoor, from Middle Dutch contoor, contoir, comptoir, from Middle French contoir, comptoir, from conter, compter (to count) + -oir (instrument sufffix). Doublet of kontor and counter

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cantore (plural cantores)

  1. (obsolete) a Dutch trading post, a branch office of the Dutch merchants
    • 1742, The speech of Borcel, the Dutch embassador at Paris, to the king of France, received and exhibited on the 25th of April 1657, A Collection of the State-papers of John Turloe, Esq., Secretary, First, to the Council of State
      But, sire, in the place of all this I am informed, that there is still further and further proceeded every where; and that they are not only not contented with the seizing and arresting of the Netherland ships and goods laden aboard the ships, but besides by an extreme rigour of the execution, they have seized upon all the cantores and warehouses of the merchants at Roan, not only those of the subjects of their H. and M. L. but also of all those, whom they suspected to have any effects in their hands belonging to Netherlanders subjects of my masters; …
    • Satire, in Two Parts, Upon the Imperfection and Abuse of Human Learning, by Samuel Butler
      When all a student knows of what he reads // Is not in 's own, but under general heads // Of common-places, not in his own power, // But, like a Dutchman's money, i' th' cantore, // Where all he can make of it at the best, // Is hardly three per cent. for interest; …

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cantor, cantōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cantore m (plural cantori)

  1. cantor, precentor
  2. singer, chorister

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

cantōre

  1. ablative singular of cantor