cantor

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See also: Cantor

English[edit]

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Wikipedia
A Cantor singing

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cantor, agent noun from perfect passive participle cantus, from verb canere (to sing) + agent suffix -or.

Noun[edit]

cantor (plural cantors)

  1. singer, especially someone who takes a special role of singing or song leading at a ceremony.
    The cantor's place in church is on the right of the choir
  2. A prayer leader in a Jewish service; a hazzan.


Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cantor (male singer), cantōrem.

Noun[edit]

cantor m (plural cantores)

  1. singer (person who sings)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cantor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cantor m (plural cantors, feminine cantora)

  1. singer (person who sings)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From canō (I sing) +‎ -tor.

Noun[edit]

cantor m (genitive cantōris); third declension

  1. singer (male)
  2. player (male)
Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cantor cantōrēs
Genitive cantōris cantōrum
Dative cantōrī cantōribus
Accusative cantōrem cantōrēs
Ablative cantōre cantōribus
Vocative cantor cantōrēs
Coordinate terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected form of cantō (I sing).

Verb[edit]

cantor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of cantō

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cantōrem (male singer).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cantor m (plural cantores, feminine cantora, feminine plural cantoras)

  1. singer (person who sings)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cantor, cantōrem.

Adjective[edit]

cantor (feminine singular cantora, masculine plural cantores, feminine plural cantoras)

  1. singing

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

cantor m (plural cantores, feminine cantora, feminine plural cantoras)

  1. singer

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cantor, cantōrem.

Noun[edit]

cantor m (plural cantori) or cantor m (plural canturi)

  1. singer, chorister

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Swedish mjölkkantor (milk cabinet), obsolete form of mjölkkontor, from obsolete kantor corresponding to modern kontor (office; building or room), from Middle Low German kantôr, kontôr, komtôr, komptor (commercial branch; writing room; counting desk/table), from Middle Dutch cantoor, contoor, contoir, comptoir, from Middle French contoir, comptoir, from conter, compter (to count) + -oir (instrument sufffix) calquing earlier Medieval Latin computōrium.

Noun[edit]

cāntōr n (definite singular cāntōrä̆, definite plural cāntōră)

  1. Alternative spelling of kanntor