caraway

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Caraway

English[edit]

caraway, habitat
caraway seeds

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English caraway, carewey, carwey, from Medieval Latin carui, from Arabic كَرَاوِيَا(karāwiyā), via Aramaic from Ancient Greek καρώ (karṓ), κάρον (káron, caraway).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkæɹəˌweɪ/
    • (file)

Noun[edit]

caraway (countable and uncountable, plural caraways)

  1. A biennial plant, Carum carvi, native to Europe and Asia, mainly grown for its seed to be used as a culinary spice.
  2. The seed-like fruit of the caraway plant.
  3. A cake or sweetmeat containing caraway seeds.
    • 1897, Imogen Clark, Will Shakespeare's Little Lad
      I'll eat her marchpane and her caraways
    • 1916, The Country Gentleman
      the housewife of today can surely match the skill of those of three centuries ago and make "caraways” or cheesecakes

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin carui, from Arabic كَرَاوِيَّا(karāwiyyā), via Aramaic from Ancient Greek καρώ (karṓ), κάρον (káron, caraway). Doublet of carvi.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkarwiː/, /ˈkarəˌwiː/, /-wɛi̯/

Noun[edit]

caraway (uncountable)

  1. Caraway or its seed.
    Synonym: carvi

Descendants[edit]

  • English: caraway

References[edit]