catholic

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Catholic

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French catholique, from Latin catholicus, from Ancient Greek καθολικός (katholikós), from κατά (katá, according to) + ὅλος (hólos, whole)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkaθ(ə)lɪk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkæθ(ə)lɪk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æθəlɪk, -æθlɪk
  • Hyphenation: cath‧o‧lic

Adjective[edit]

catholic (comparative more catholic, superlative most catholic)

  1. Universal; all-encompassing.
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, I.29:
      Essentially, and in idea, the empire, in the minds of the Romans, was world-wide. This conception descended to the Church, which was ‘Catholic’ in spite of Buddhists, Confucians, and (later) Muhammadans.
    • 1995, Brian D. Crandall & Peter W. Stahl, Human Digestive Effects on a Micromammalian Skeleton, Journal of Archaeological Science (1995) 22, 789-797:
      This semifossorial mammal tends to reside in areas with herbaceous cover, frequenting runways in the upper soil horizons where it feeds on a highly catholic diet of animal and plant materials []
  2. Pertaining to all kinds of people and their range of tastes, proclivities etc.; liberal.
    • 2003, Simon Winchester, The Meaning of Everything; The Story of the Oxford English Dictionary, New York: Oxford University Press. p.72:
      He was omnivorous in his appetite for knowledge, quite catholic in his range of interests []
  3. Alternative letter-case form of Catholic

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]