coeliac

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See also: cœliac

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin coeliacus, from Ancient Greek κοιλιακός (koiliakós), from κοιλία (koilía, belly). Cognate with coelom.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

coeliac (not comparable)

  1. (Britain, anatomy) Relating to the abdomen, or to the cavity of the abdomen.
    • 1838, William James Erasmus Wilson, Practical and Surgical Anatomy[1], page 350:
      Next remove the middle portion of the lesser omentum, and feel for the coeliac axis.
    • 2002, Colin Pinnock, Ted Lin, Tim Smith, Fundamentals of Anaesthesia, page 218,
      The coeliac plexus is formed by the two interconnecting coeliac ganglia which lie either side of the coeliac artery.
    • 2010, Robert H. Whitaker, Neil R. Borley, Instant Anatomy, page 85,
      The coeliac ganglia lie on each side of the coeliac trunk.
  2. (Britain) Abbreviation of coeliac disease; used attributively.
    • 1982, S. Ahlstedt, Recent Trends in Allergen and Complement Research[2], page 48:
      The results of skin testing and RAST indicate that most coeliac patients do not have circulating IgE specific for wheat proteins [25, 34, 108].
    • 1994, Norman Leslie Kent, A. D. Evers, Technology of cereals: An Introduction for Students of Food Science and Agriculture, page 297,
      Most coeliac patients are childen, the symptoms showing when cereals are first introduced in their diet.
    • 2008, Helen Griffiths, Coeliac Disease: Nursing Care and Management[3], page 10:
      Thus more fortunately for most coeliac patients a reliable diagnosis could now be made on the basis of one set of small bowel biopsies as opposed to three.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

coeliac (plural coeliacs)

  1. (Britain) Someone who has coeliac disease.
    • 1961, Association of National European and Mediterranean Societies of Gastroenterology, Proceedings VIth meeting of the "Association des Sociétés Nationales Européenes et Méditerranéennes de Gastro-Entérologie"[4], page 624:
      In all 5 untreated coeliacs as well as the 3 partially treated coeliacs who were in relapse at the time of biopsy, villi were entirely absent.
    • 1986, David R. Triger, Clinical Immunology of the Liver and Gastrointestinal Tract[5], page 67:
      Hyposplenism in coeliacs does not appear to lead to these diseases.
    • 1999, Giuseppe Gobbi, Epilepsy and Other Neurological Disorders in Coeliac Disease[6], page 212:
      Instead, anecdotal observations came to dominate the literature, describing adult coeliacs as mentally peculiar, excessively nervous and unstable, depressive, or even schizophrenic (Paulley, 1959; Dohan, 1966).