deject

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dejeter, from Latin deicere (to throw down).

Pronunciation[edit]

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Verb[edit]

deject (third-person singular simple present dejects, present participle dejecting, simple past and past participle dejected)

  1. (transitive) Make sad or dispirited.
    • 1743, Robert Drury, The Pleasant, and Surprizing Adventures of Mr. Robert Drury, during his Fifteen Years Captivity on the Island of Madagascar, London, p. 73,[1]
      [] the Thoughts of my Friends, and native Country, and the Improbability of ever seeing them again, made me very melancholy; and dejected me to that Degree, that sometimes I could not forbear indulging my Grief in private, and bursting out into a Flood of Tears.
    • 1933 Arthur Melville Jordan: Educational Psychology (page 60) [2]
      On the other hand, there is nothing which dejects school children quite so much as failure.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To cast down.
    • (Can we date this quote by Nicholas Udall and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Christ dejected himself even unto the hells.
    • 1642, Thomas Fuller, The Holy State, Cambridge: John Williams, Book 5, Chapter 1, p. 358,[3]
      [] sometimes she dejects her eyes in a seeming civility; and many mistake in her a cunning for a modest look.

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