drob

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See also: drób

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

drob

  1. second-person singular imperative of drobit

Noun[edit]

drob f

  1. genitive plural of droba

Anagrams[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *drobь (entrails). Cognate with Upper Sorbian drob, Polish drób, Serbo-Croatian drȏb, and Russian дробь (drobʹ, fraction, small shot).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

drob m

  1. anything fragmented or cut into pieces
  2. lead shot
  3. entrails, intestines; mesentery

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • drob in Ernst Muka/Mucke (St. Petersburg and Prague 1911–28): Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow / Wörterbuch der nieder-wendischen Sprache und ihrer Dialekte. Reprinted 2008, Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.
  • drob in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From a (South) Slavic language (e.g. Serbo-Croatian drob, Bulgarian дроб (drob), etc.) or from a common Slavic drobĭ, from Proto-Slavic *drobь (entrails).

Noun[edit]

drob m (plural drobi)

  1. a traditional dish usually served at Easter made from minced up offal and entrails (often of lamb), seasoned with herbs, and boiled in the caul or omentum, similar to haggis (which is however boiled in the sheep stomach and not as seasoned)

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Ruthenian or Russian drok, with an alteration probably due to influence from the above word.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

drob m (plural drobi)

  1. dyer's broom (Genista tinctoria)

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *drobь.

Noun[edit]

drȏb m (Cyrillic spelling дро̑б)

  1. bowels, guts, intestines
  2. offal

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]