eave

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A back-formation from eaves, from a misinterpretation of the -s ending as forming a plural.[1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

eave (plural eaves)

  1. (architecture) Alternative form of eaves (the underside of a roof that extends beyond the external walls of a building) [from mid 18th c.]
    • 2006 February, Jill Kirchner Simpson, “Building a Modular Home”, in Country Living, volume 29, number 2, page 51:
      Features such as shutters, eave brackets, transoms, a wraparound porch, and a pergola all help establish the style of this home.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ eave, n.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2020.
  2. ^ Compare eaves, n.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2020; “eaves, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English even, from Old English ǣfen, from Proto-West Germanic *ābanþ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

eave

  1. eve

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 37