fides

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See also: Fides

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

PIE root
*bʰeydʰ-

From Proto-Indo-European *bʰeydʰ- ‎(to command, to persuade, to trust). Cognate to Latin fīdō ‎(I trust) and Proto-Germanic *bīdaną.

Noun[edit]

fidēs f ‎(genitive fideī); fifth declension

  1. faith, belief
  2. reliance
  3. confidence, trust
Inflection[edit]

Fifth declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative fidēs fidēs
genitive fideī fidērum
dative fideī fidēbus
accusative fidem fidēs
ablative fidē fidēbus
vocative fidēs fidēs
Related terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Ancient Greek σφίδη ‎(sphídē).

Noun[edit]

fidēs f ‎(genitive fidis); third declension

  1. chord
  2. the gut-string of a musical instrument
  3. (in the plural) lyre, lute, harp (by extension)

Usage notes[edit]

Usually encountered in the plural.

Declension[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative fidēs fidēs
genitive fidis fidum
dative fidī fidibus
accusative fidem fidēs
ablative fide fidibus
vocative fidēs fidēs

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Inflection of fīdō ‎(I trust).

Verb[edit]

fīdēs

  1. second-person singular future active indicative of fīdō

References[edit]

  • fides1” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • fides2” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • fides” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to fly to some one for refuge: confugere ad aliquem or ad opem, ad fidem alicuius
    • to give a veracious and historic account of a thing: narrare aliquid ad fidem historiae
    • to teach some one to play a stringed instrument: docere aliquem fidibus
    • to learn to play a stringed instrument: fidibus discere (De Sen. 8. 26)
    • to play on the lyre: fidibus canere
    • to strike the strings of the lyre: pellere nervos in fidibus
    • to believe a person: fidem habere alicui
    • to make some one believe a thing: fidem alicuius rei facere alicui
    • to believe in, trust in a thing: fidem tribuere, adiungere alicui rei
    • to rob a person of his credit: fidem abrogare, derogare alicui
    • to weaken, destroy a man's credit: fidem alicuius imminuere, infirmare (opp. confirmare)
    • to entrust a thing to a person's good faith: committere aliquid alicui or alicuius fidei
    • to preserve one's loyalty: fidem colere, servare
    • to keep faith with a person, keep one's word: fidem praestare alicui
    • to break one's word: fidem laedere, violare, frangere
    • to make a person waver in his loyalty: fidem alicuius labefactare (Cluent. 60. 194)
    • to put oneself under some one's protection: se conferre, se tradere, se permittere in alicuius fidem
    • to flee for refuge to some one: confugere ad aliquem, ad fidem alicuius
    • to take a person under one's protection: in fidem recipere aliquem (B. G. 2. 15. 1)
    • to implore some one's protection: fidem alicuius obsecrare, implorare
    • to confirm, ratify, sanction something: fidem addere alicui rei
    • to guarantee the protection of the state; to promise a safe-conduct: fidem publicam dare, interponere (Sall. Iug. 32. 1)
    • to give one's word that..: fidem dare alicui (opp. accipere) (c. Acc. c. Inf.)
    • to keep one's word (not tenere): fidem servare (opp. fallere)
    • to fulfil a promise: fidem persolvere
    • to fulfil a promise: fidem (promissum) praestare
    • to pledge one's word to..: fidem interponere (Sall. Iug. 32. 5)
    • to break one's word: fidem prodere
    • to break one's word: fidem frangere
    • to make a thing credible: fidem facere, afferre alicui rei (opp. demere, de-, abrogare fidem)
    • (ambiguous) a thing finds credence, is credible: aliquid fidem habet (vid. also fides under sect. VII., History)
    • to rob a person of his credit: fidem derogare alicui
    • to shake credit: fidem moliri (Liv. 6. 11. 8)
    • to surrender oneself to the discretion of some one: se permittere in fidem atque in potestatem alicuius (B. G. 2. 3)
    • to deal mercifully with some one: in fidem recipere aliquem (Fam. 13. 16)
    • (ambiguous) historic times: historicorum fide contestata memoria
    • (ambiguous) historic truth: historiae, rerum fides
    • (ambiguous) an acknowledged historical fact: res historiae fide comprobata
    • (ambiguous) genuine historical truth: incorrupta rerum fides
    • (ambiguous) to remain loyal: in fide manere (B. G. 7. 4. 5)
    • (ambiguous) to undermine a person's loyalty: de fide deducere or a fide abducere aliquem
    • (ambiguous) having exchanged pledges, promises: fide data et accepta (Sall. Iug. 81. 1)
    • (ambiguous) to be bound by one's word; to be on one's honour: fide obstrictum teneri (Pis. 13. 29)
    • (ambiguous) a thing finds credence, is credible: aliquid fidem habet (vid. also fides under sect. VII., History)
    • (ambiguous) to promise an oath to..: iureiurando ac fide se obstringere, ut
    • (ambiguous) credit and financial position: fides et ratio pecuniarum
    • (ambiguous) credit is going down: fides (vid. sect. IX. 10, note fides has six...) concidit
    • (ambiguous) a man's credit begins to go down: fides aliquem deficere coepit
    • (ambiguous) credit has disappeared: fides (de foro) sublata est (Leg. Agr. 2. 3. 8)
    • (ambiguous) credit is low throughout Italy: fides tota Italia est angusta

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

fides

  1. dative plural of fid