flack

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See also: fläck

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English flacken ‎(to palpitate, flutter), akin to Middle Dutch vlacken ‎(to flicker, flash, sparkle), Danish flakke ‎(to wander), Swedish flacka ‎(to rove, rove about, ramble), Icelandic flakka ‎(to move). Compare also Icelandic flaka ‎(to flap, hang loose), Swedish flaxa ‎(to flap, flutter).

Verb[edit]

flack ‎(third-person singular simple present flacks, present participle flacking, simple past and past participle flacked)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To flutter; palpitate.
  2. (intransitive, Britain dialectal) To hang loosely; flag.
  3. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To beat by flapping.

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown

Noun[edit]

flack ‎(plural flacks)

  1. A publicist, a publicity agent.
    • 1998, Winston Smith, Art Crime: The Montage Art of Winston Smith, page 25
      Edward Bernay, who was a consultant to the US Delegation to the Versailles Peace Conference which terminated the first World War (and who finally wound up as a flack for the United Fruit Company in Latin America), believed that propaganda and its covert marketing could effectively alter the will of the American public.
    • 1999, Patricia Cornwell, The Southern Cross, page 233
      Thought you were flack," she said.
      "I'm not flack."
      "All right, P.R., a reporter, a novelist."

Verb[edit]

flack ‎(third-person singular simple present flacks, present participle flacking, simple past and past participle flacked)

  1. To publicise, to promote.
    • 1997, Don DeLillo, Underworld:
      [..] he told funny stories about his early days in the theater district, flacking shows up and down the street, but Klara wasn’t listening.

Etymology 3[edit]

Variant of flak.

Noun[edit]

flack ‎(countable and uncountable, plural flacks)

  1. Alternative spelling of flak.

External links[edit]

  • flack at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • flack in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911