frangipani

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French frangipane, from Italian frangipane. Possibly named after Muzio Frangipane, a 16th-century marquess of the Italian noble Frangipani family, who invented a plumeria-scented perfume. The name Frangipane derives from frangere (to break) +‎ pane (bread), a reference to the family's distribution of bread in time of famine.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌfrændʒɪˈpɑːnɪ/, /ˌfrændʒɪˈpænɪ/

Noun[edit]

frangipani (countable and uncountable, plural frangipanis or frangipani)

  1. Any of several tropical American shrubs and trees of the genus Plumeria, having fragrant, showy, funnel-shaped flowers of a wide range of colours from creamy to red.
    Synonym: plumeria
    • 2022 November 26, Virginia Feito, “Sweating Through a Honeymoon in Paradise”, in The New York Times[1]:
      I casually let this information drop as our concierge drives us through the resort in a buggy, a frangipani flower tucked behind his ear. He promises to fix the bug problem and drops us off at the lobby.
  2. A perfume obtained from this plant or imitating the odour of its flowers.
  3. Alternative form of frangipane (cream made from ground almonds; pastry filled with this cream).
    • 2010 November 24, Amanda Hesser, “Recipe Redux: Fyrstekake (Royal Cake), 1963”, in The New York Times Magazine[2]:
      Lahlou baked a cardamom frangipani and cut it into pieces as a base for roasted chicken. (Well, I used chicken; he used squab. Use whatever bird you fancy.) Then he topped the frangipani and poultry with kale and leaf-thin sugar-and-cardamom-sprinkled phyllo rectangles — made by baking them between baking sheets — like a savory mille-feuille.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]