guado

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: guadò

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡwa.do/
  • Rhymes: -ado
  • Hyphenation: guà‧do

Etymology 1[edit]

Possibly ultimately from Proto-Germanic *wadą (ford), from Proto-Indo-European *wadʰom, *wh₂dʰóm (ultimately from the root *weh₂dʰ-) perhaps through a Vulgar Latin *uadam. Compare French gué (ford), Catalan gual, Occitan ga. Other sources list it as deriving from Latin vadum,[1][2][3] itself from the same Proto Indo-European root as the Germanic, and thus cognate to it. However, it was likely influenced in pronunciation by the corresponding Germanic term (the change of Classical Latin V, originally pronounced /w/, to /v/ had probably already occurred in the Vulgar Latin dialects by the Proto-Romance era in the early Middle Ages; thus the normal result in Italian would have been *vado). Compare Spanish vado, Portuguese vau, Romanian vad, Sicilian vadu, which were not affected by the Germanic influence.

Noun[edit]

guado m (plural guadi)

  1. ford
  2. wade
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

guado

  1. first-person singular present indicative of guadare

Etymology 2[edit]

From Lombardic waid[4] or Old High German weit,[5] from Proto-West Germanic *waiʀd.

Noun[edit]

guado m (plural guadi)

  1. dyer's woad, glastum (the plant Isatis tinctoria)
  2. woad, indigo (blue dye)

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ guado (lessico) in sapere.it – De Agostini Editore
  2. ^ Pianigiani, Ottorino (1907), “guado”, in Vocabolario etimologico della lingua italiana[1] (in Italian), Rome: Albrighi & Segati
  3. ^ guado1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  4. ^ guado2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  5. ^ Pianigiani, Ottorino (1907), “guado”, in Vocabolario etimologico della lingua italiana[2] (in Italian), Rome: Albrighi & Segati

Anagrams[edit]