wade

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See also: Wade and wadę

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English waden, from Old English wadan, from Proto-Germanic *wadaną, from Proto-Indo-European *weh₂dʰ- (to go). Cognates include German waten (wade) and Latin vādō (go, walk; rush) (whence English evade, invade, pervade).

Verb[edit]

wade (third-person singular simple present wades, present participle wading, simple past and past participle waded)

  1. (intransitive) to walk through water or something that impedes progress.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 2”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      So eagerly the fiend [] / With head, hands, wings, or feet, pursues his way, / And swims, or sinks, or wades, or creeps, or flies.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter VIII
      After breakfast the men set out to hunt, while the women went to a large pool of warm water covered with a green scum and filled with billions of tadpoles. They waded in to where the water was about a foot deep and lay down in the mud. They remained there from one to two hours and then returned to the cliff.
  2. (intransitive) to progress with difficulty
    to wade through a dull book
    • 1697, “Aeneis”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      And wades through fumes, and gropes his way.
    • (Can we date this quote by Davenant and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      The king's admirable conduct has waded through all these difficulties.
  3. (transitive) to walk through (water or similar impediment); to pass through by wading
    wading swamps and rivers
  4. (intransitive) To enter recklessly.
    to wade into a fight or a debate
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

wade (plural wades)

  1. An act of wading.
  2. (colloquial) A ford; a place to cross a river.
Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

wade (uncountable)

  1. Obsolete form of woad.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Mortimer to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for wade in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch wade, from Old Dutch *watho, from Proto-Germanic *waþwô.

Cognate with German Wade (calf (of leg)), Swedish vad (calf (of leg)) and Afrikaans waai (popliteal).

Noun[edit]

wade f (plural waden, diminutive waadje n)

  1. popliteus
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: waai

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

wade f (plural waden, diminutive waadje n)

  1. shroud
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle Dutch wade, reformed from waet through influence of the collective gewade (modern gewaad). Further from Old Dutch *wāt, from Proto-Germanic *wēd-.

Cognate with Middle High German wāt, Old Saxon wād, Old English wǣd, Old Norse váð.

Noun[edit]

wade f (plural waden, diminutive waadje n)

  1. type of trawl
Synonyms[edit]
Hypernyms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Verb[edit]

wade

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of waden

Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

wade

  1. Alternative form of waden