warden

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See also: Warden

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English wardein, from Anglo-Norman wardein, Old Northern French wardein, from warder (to guard), variant of Old French guarder (to guard) (whence modern French garder, also English guard), from Proto-Germanic *ward-; related to Old High German wartēn (to watch). Compare guardian, French gardien, from Old French guardian, guardein. Compare also ward and reward. Doublet of guardian.

Noun[edit]

warden (plural wardens)

  1. (archaic or literary) A guard or watchman.
  2. A chief administrative officer of a prison.
    • 1934, Nathanael West, “Chapter 7”, in A Cool Million[1]:
      The warden of the state prison, Ezekiel Purdy, was a kind man if stern. He invariably made all newcomers a little speech of welcome []
  3. An official charged with supervisory duties or with the enforcement of specific laws or regulations; such as a game warden or air-raid warden
  4. A governing official in various institutions
    the warden of a college
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Welsh: warden, gwarden
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

warden (third-person singular simple present wardens, present participle wardening, simple past and past participle wardened)

  1. To carry out the duties of a warden.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English wardon, origin uncertain; perhaps from Anglo-Norman or Anglo-Latin wardo, -ōnis.[1]

Noun[edit]

warden (plural wardens)

  1. A variety of pear.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ wardǒun, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Anagrams[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English warden.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

warden m (plural wardeniaid or wardeiniaid)

  1. warden

Derived terms[edit]