hendiadys

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Medieval Latin, from Ancient Greek ἕν (hén), stem of εἷς (heîs, one) + διά (diá, through) + δύο (dúo, two), “one [idea] through two [words]”.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /hɛnˈdaɪ.ədɪs/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Examples
  • safe and sound
  • “nice and warm” (for “nicely warm”)
  • “sound and fury” (for “furious sound”)
  • “come and get it” (for “come get it”)

hendiadys (plural hendiadyses)

  1. (rhetoric) A figure of speech used for emphasis, where two words joined by and are used to express a single complex idea.
    Coordinate term: hendiatris
    • 1984, Wilfred G. E. Watson, Classical Hebrew Poetry, A&C Black, →ISBN, page 327:
      Some examples of hendiadys comprise two words in the bound state; others, two words in appositional hendiadys. It would seem that certain cases of appositional hendiadys are closely related to wordpairs (see WORD-PAIRS, BREAK-UP), though which way the development proceeded is far from certain.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

hendiadys m (plural hendiadys)

  1. (rhetoric) hendiadys

Further reading[edit]