hirple

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A word of unknown origin, first recorded in Scots sources from the late fifteenth century; but probably from Old Norse herpast(to suffer from cramp) the middle voice verb. Compare the Icelandic herpa(to contract, to draw together).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hirple ‎(third-person singular simple present hirples, present participle hirpling, simple past and past participle hirpled)

  1. (intransitive, Scotland, northern Britain) to walk with a limp, to drag a limb, to walk lamely; to move with a gait somewhere between walking and crawling.
    • 1922, John Buchan, Huntingtower,
      Get you on that bicycle and hurry on, and I'll hirple after you the best I can.
    • 2015, Kate Atkinson, A God in Ruins, ISBN 9780385618717, page 136:
      A woman hirpled along the corridor towards them with the aid of a walking frame.

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Old Norse.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hirple ‎(third-person singular present hirples, present participle hirplin, past hirpelt, past participle hirpelt)

  1. to limp, hobble
  2. to cripple or hamper some venture or project

Noun[edit]

hirple ‎(plural hirples)

  1. a limp

Derived terms[edit]