idioglot

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

idioglot (not comparable)

  1. (music) Having a vibrating reed that is an integral part of the instrument.
    • 1975, Sibyl Marcuse, A survey of musical instruments, page 729:
      Further north, in rural Lithuania, a folk clarinet has a cylindrical tube closed at the top, with idioglot reed taken in the player's mouth for its entire length.
    • 1995, Colin James Lawson, The Cambridge Companion to the Clarinet, →ISBN, page 2:
      Pipes with idioglot reeds (not separate pieces of cane, but cut in the tube itself) have been identified from later civilisations, for example the Greek aulos and the Sardinian launeddas.
    • 2008, Eric Hoeprich, The Clarinet, →ISBN, page 13:
      Alongside the clarinet of today, idioglot instruments are still played in many European countries, along the Baltic and in the Balkans, as well as Asia, Africa and South America.

Noun[edit]

idioglot (plural idioglots)

  1. (music) An idioglot instrument.
    • 1987, The World of Music - Volume 29, page 69:
      Masa (tongs) -an idioglot with a sound-rhythmical effect and with a secondary musical function; made of iron.
    • 1988, Eric Montbel, Le Roseau et la musique, page 78:
      These simple instruments (idioglots) still found in Syria, Crete, Turkmenistan amongst others are also used by children who have a good supply of reeds nearby.
    • 2016, Michael J. Pagliaro, Basic Elements of Music, →ISBN, page 88:
      The single reed iterations were often idioglots because of the simple structural design required to produce such a sound generator.
  2. A person who speaks an idiolect.
    • 1891, W. Hale White & C.H. Golding-Bird, “Two Cases of Idioglossia, with Phonographic Demonstration of the Peculiarity of Speech”, in Medico-chirurgical transactions, volume 74:
      In a case quoted by Romanes, the reference to which we give later, a child aged 4½ years was the subject of idioglossia, but her younger brother was able to converse with her in her own idioglot language, although he also talked childish English.
    • 1995, Martin Amis, The Information, →ISBN:
      For some reason it is the destiny of Richard Tull, to be surrounded by ideoglots. Idioglots, with their idiolects.
    • 2009, B Geary, “Essential tropical emergency medicine skills”, in Emergency Medicine Journal, volume 26, number 6:
      I achieve this effect somewhat reliably when I suppress the internal dialogue of self-absorptive self-consciousness and communicate using pidgin English. I am an idioglot using a personalised idiolect.

Antonyms[edit]