jeel

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

jeel (plural jeels)

  1. Alternative form of jheel
    • 1820, Walter Hamilton, A Geographical, Statistical, and Historical Description of Hindostan and the Adjacent Countries, Volume 1, page 246,
      The pieces of stagnant water may be divided into jeels which contain water throughout the year, and chaongre which dry up in the cold season.
    • 1827, East India Company, Journey across the Arracan Mountains, The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Miscellany, Volume 23, page 16,
      On the banks of this jeel the party encamped, about two miles from the village.
    • 1827, The Burmese War: Operations on the Sihet Frontier, 1824, The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Register for British India and Its Dependencies, Volume 24, page 551,
      The reports of some hircarrahs having induced a belief that a short passage might be discovered across the jeels from the Gogra towards Tilyn, Lieut. Fisher, of the Quarter-Master General's department, was despatched to reconnoitre the outlets from that river, accompanied by Lieut. Craigie and five sipahees, in two dingees.
    • 1934, George Orwell, Burmese Days:
      There were snipe in countless myriads, and wild geese in flocks that rose from the jeel with a roar like a goods train crossing an iron bridge.

Etymology 2[edit]

Manx jeeyl, jeeill ("damage"), cognate to Irish díobháil.

Noun[edit]

jeel

  1. (Isle of Man) Damage; harm.
    • 1889, Thomas Edward Brown, The Manx Witch: And Other Poems, page 79:
      And the gel, you know, as freckened as freckened,
      Because of coorse she navar reckoned
      But Misthriss Banks could do the jeel 1
      She was braggin she could, and she'd take and kneel
      On her bended knees, and she'd cuss — the baste !
      []
      1 Damage.
    • 1908, Cushag (Josephine Kermode), Eunys, Or the Dalby Maid, page 16:
      An' first an' last upon the flure, an' spinnin' at the wheel,
      But that strange silence on her still of what had done the jeel.
    • 1924, Sophia Morrison, Edmund Goodwin, A vocabulary of the Anglo-Manx dialect,
      page 73, entry "Govvag":
      The jeel (damage) the govags is doin to the nets is urrov all marcy.
      page 188, entry "Traa-dy-liooar":
      An' the wan (one) that's doin all the jeel (damage) is wickad Traa-dy-liooar (Time-enough). (Cushag.)

Further reading[edit]