jeremiad

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See also: jeremiád

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French jérémiade, from Jérémie, from Latin Ieremias, from Hebrew ירמיה(yirm'yá, Jeremiah). Named after biblical prophet Jeremiah, who lamented the moral state of Judah and predicted her downfall.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jeremiad (plural jeremiads)

  1. A long speech or prose work that bitterly laments the state of society and its morals, and often contains a prophecy of its coming downfall.
    Synonyms: lament, lamentation, tirade; see also Thesaurus:diatribe
    • 1895Mary Gaunt, The Moving Finger, A Digger's Christmas
      "Father Maguire," he said in the broadest of Cork brogues, without the ghost of a smile on his grave Irish face, "is it a song yez wantin'? Well, thin, it's just a jeremiad I 'd be singin' yez, an' not another song at all, at all."
    • 2006: The Columbus Dispatch, May 5
      “This is precisely the manner of Balkanization that Schlesinger cautioned us about in his prescient jeremiad on multiculturalism, The Disuniting of America.”
    • 2007, The Guardian, [1]
      Cannes is smacking its lips in anticipation of filmmaker and provocateur Michael Moore's latest jeremiad against the US administration, which receives its premiere at the film festival today.
    • 2015 March 30, Michael Billington, “Look Back in Anger: how John Osborne liberated theatrical language”, in The Guardian[2]:
      What few of us realised at the time was that Osborne, while endorsing most of Jimmy’s jeremiads, also had a sneaking sympathy for his father-in-law, Colonel Redfern, an upper-class relic of the Raj.

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