lupin

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: łupin and Lupin

English[edit]

Garden lupins (Russel hybrid)
pickled lupin beans
single lupine blossom
Wolf's fang inside lupine blossom

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English lupyne, lupine, from Old French lupin, from Latin lupīnus (pertaining to the wolf). The reason for association of the plant with the wolf is the wolf-like “fang” within the blossom. It has also been linked to an assumed depletion of nutrients in the soil.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈluːpɪn/
  • Rhymes: -uːpɪn
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

lupin (plural lupins)

  1. (botany) Any member of the genus Lupinus in the family Fabaceae.
    • 1991, R. F. Keeler, Handbook of Natural Toxins: Toxicology of Plant and Fungal Compounds, CRC Press (→ISBN), page 371:
      Lupins had been introduced into German agriculture in 1841 and had rapidly become a popular and useful feed for sheep as well as being used as a green manure plant for increasing soil fertility in poor-quality, sandy soils.
  2. A lupin bean, a yellow legume seed of a Lupinus plant (usually Lupinus luteus), used as feed for sheep and cattle and commonly eaten in the Mediterranean area and in Latin America although toxic if prepared improperly.
    Synonym: lupini
    • 1998, Tam Garland, A. Catherine Barr, Toxic Plants and Other Natural Toxicants, CABI (→ISBN), page 143:
      Lupins contain less than 3% starch (Evans, 1994), the main fermentable carbohydrate involved in rumen acidosis when cereal grains are fed to ruminants. For this reason lupins have generally been regarded as a completely safe feed for sheep and cattle, and required no gradual introduction (Rowe, 1995).
    • 2010, Ken Albala, Rosanna Nafziger Henderson, The Lost Art of Real Cooking: Rediscovering the Pleasures of Traditional Food One Recipe at a Time, Penguin (→ISBN)
      Lupins, although a bean, are similar to olives aesthetically, and are equally good with breakfast. The trick is first to soak them overnight until rehydrated, then boil them for a few hours like any bean. They will not soften. Then soak them again, changing the water every day for several weeks until the bitterness is gone.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tony Winch (2007) Growing Food: A Guide to Food Production, Springer Science & Business Media, →ISBN, page 278: “The name “lupin” comes from the Latin word for wolf, in the mistaken belief that the plants depleted or “wolfed” nutrients from the soil.”

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin lupinus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lupin (feminine singular lupine, masculine plural lupins, feminine plural lupines)

  1. lupine

Noun[edit]

lupin m (plural lupins)

  1. lupin

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lupinus

Noun[edit]

lupin m (definite singular lupinen, indefinite plural lupiner, definite plural lupinene)

  1. a lupin, or lupine (US)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lupinus

Noun[edit]

lupin m (definite singular lupinen, indefinite plural lupinar, definite plural lupinane)

  1. a lupin, or lupine (US)

References[edit]