lupin

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: łupin

English[edit]

Garden lupins (Russel hybrid)
pickled lupin beans

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French lupin, from Latin lupīnus (pertaining to the wolf). The reason for association of the plant with the wolf is unclear. It has been linked to an assumed depletion of nutrients in the soil.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈluːpɪn/
  • Rhymes: -uːpɪn
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

lupin (plural lupins)

  1. (botany) Any member of the genus Lupinus in the family Fabaceae.
    • 1991, R. F. Keeler, Handbook of Natural Toxins: Toxicology of Plant and Fungal Compounds, CRC Press (→ISBN), page 371:
      Lupins had been introduced into German agriculture in 1841 and had rapidly become a popular and useful feed for sheep as well as being used as a green manure plant for increasing soil fertility in poor-quality, sandy soils.
  2. A lupin bean, a yellow legume seed of a Lupinus plant (usually Lupinus luteus), used as feed for sheep and cattle and commonly eaten in the Mediterranean area and in Latin America although toxic if prepared improperly.
    Synonym: lupini
    • 1998, Tam Garland, A. Catherine Barr, Toxic Plants and Other Natural Toxicants, CABI (→ISBN), page 143:
      Lupins contain less than 3% starch (Evans, 1994), the main fermentable carbohydrate involved in rumen acidosis when cereal grains are fed to ruminants. For this reason lupins have generally been regarded as a completely safe feed for sheep and cattle, and required no gradual introduction (Rowe, 1995).
    • 2010, Ken Albala, Rosanna Nafziger Henderson, The Lost Art of Real Cooking: Rediscovering the Pleasures of Traditional Food One Recipe at a Time, Penguin (→ISBN)
      Lupins, although a bean, are similar to olives aesthetically, and are equally good with breakfast. The trick is first to soak them overnight until rehydrated, then boil them for a few hours like any bean. They will not soften. Then soak them again, changing the water every day for several weeks until the bitterness is gone.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tony Winch (2007) Growing Food: A Guide to Food Production, Springer Science & Business Media, →ISBN, page 278: “The name “lupin” comes from the Latin word for wolf, in the mistaken belief that the plants depleted or “wolfed” nutrients from the soil.”

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin lupinus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lupin (feminine singular lupine, masculine plural lupins, feminine plural lupines)

  1. lupine

Noun[edit]

lupin m (plural lupins)

  1. lupin

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lupinus

Noun[edit]

lupin m (definite singular lupinen, indefinite plural lupiner, definite plural lupinene)

  1. a lupin, or lupine (US)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lupinus

Noun[edit]

lupin m (definite singular lupinen, indefinite plural lupinar, definite plural lupinane)

  1. a lupin, or lupine (US)

References[edit]