mawmenny

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle English mawmene, from Anglo-Norman maumenee, an alteration of Arabic مأمونية(maʾmūniyya) after malmener, maumener (to mistreat).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mawmenny (uncountable)

  1. (historical) A dish eaten in later medieval England, made with spice and almost always with boneless meat from poultry (usually teased or mashed; most recipes name capon as an option), usually containing wine and either sugar or honey.
    • 2000, “"Of Fish and Flesh and Tender Breede Of Win both White and Reede": Eating and Drinking in Middle English Narrative Texts”, in Patricia Shaw, Obra Reunida de Patricia Shaw[1], Oviedo: Universidad de Oviedo, page 78:
      [] a remark certainly borne out by Wynnere's list, which includes: wild geese, bitterns, snipe, larks, linnets (sprinkled with sugar!), woodcock, woodpecker, teal, and titmice, the meal to be rounded off with rabbits, pasties, pies, mawmenny and custard pies!
    • 2002, Constance B. Hieatt, “Medieval Britain”, in Melitta Weiss Adamson, editor, Regional Cuisines of Medieval Europe: A Book of Essays[2], New York: Routledge, →ISBN, page 38:
      What is "different" here is the absence of the more elaborate aristocratic favorites of earlier times. such as Mawmenny.
    • 2003, Gilly Lehmann, “The Late Medieval Menu in England - A Reappraisal”, in Food and History: Revue de l'Institut Européen d'Histoire de l'Alimentation[3], volume 1, Brepols, DOI:10.1484/J.FOOD.2.300503:
      There was no fixed order for the different sweet potages, however: one finds mawmenny at least once at every course, and the other types are also placed randomly.

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

mawmenny

  1. Alternative form of mawmene