monograph

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology[edit]

From mono- (one) +‎ -graph (write).

Noun[edit]

monograph (plural monographs)

  1. A scholarly book or a treatise on a single subject or a group of related subjects, usually written by one person.
    • 1961 August, “New reading on railways:The Wirral Railway”, in Trains Illustrated, page vii:
      The complex history of the Wirral Railway and the lines with which it was interlinked needs more lucid treatment than is given in this 39-page monograph - and clearer maps and an index.
    • 1996 March, Cullen Murphy, "Hello Darkness", The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 277, No. 3, pp. 22-24.
      I had never given much thought to the role of darkness in ordinary human affairs until I read a monograph prepared by John Staudenmaier, a historian of technology and a Jesuit priest, for a recent conference at MIT.
    • 2018, James Lambert, “Setting the Record Straight: An In-depth Examination of Hobson-Jobson”, in International Journal of Lexicography, volume 31, number 4, DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/ijl/ecy010, page 494:
      Crooke made a few references to two of his monographs (1896a and 1896b) but did not take quotations from his own works.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

monograph (third-person singular simple present monographs, present participle monographing, simple past and past participle monographed)

  1. (transitive) To write a monograph on (a subject).
    • 2009 April 26, Charles Isherwood, “A Long Wait for Another Shot at Broadway”, in New York Times[1]:
      It is among the most studied, monographed, celebrated and sent-up works of modern art, and perhaps as influential as any from the last century.
  2. (transitive, US) Of the FDA: to publish a standard that authorizes the use of (a substance).

Anagrams[edit]