norn

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See also: Norn

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English nornen, nurnen, from Old English gnornan, gnornian ‎(to be sad, murmur, complain, mourn, lament, grieve), from gnorn ‎(sad, sorrowful, troubled, depressed), from Proto-Germanic *gnurnaz ‎(sad), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰnews- ‎(to gnaw, scrape, rub). Cognate with Old Saxon gnornōn ‎(to be sad).

Verb[edit]

norn ‎(third-person singular simple present norns, present participle norning, simple past and past participle norned)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To mourn; complain.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To bring forward; proffer; propose.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To say; speak; utter; tell.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To call.

Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse norn.

Noun[edit]

norn f (genitive singular nornar, plural nornir)

  1. (Norse mythology) any of the three goddesses of fate or destiny.
Declension[edit]
Declension of norn
f2 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative norn nornin nornir nornirnar
accusative norn nornina nornir nornirnar
dative norn nornini nornum nornunum
genitive nornar nornarinnar norna nornanna
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English Norn or Scots Norn, from Norn, from Old Norse norrǿna.

Noun[edit]

norn n (genitive singular norns, uncountable)

  1. (language) Norn
Declension[edit]
Singular
Indefinite
Nominative norn
Accusative norn
Dative norni
Genitive norns

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

norn f ‎(genitive singular nornar, nominative plural nornir)

  1. witch (person who uses magic)

Declension[edit]