norn

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See also: Norn

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English nornen, nurnen, from Old English gnornan, gnornian (to be sad, murmur, complain, mourn, lament, grieve), from gnorn (sad, sorrowful, troubled, depressed), from Proto-Germanic *gnurnaz (sad), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰnews- (to gnaw, scrape, rub). Cognate with Old Saxon gnornōn (to be sad).

Verb[edit]

norn (third-person singular simple present norns, present participle norning, simple past and past participle norned)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To mourn; complain.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To bring forward; proffer; propose.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To say; speak; utter; tell.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To call.

Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse norn.

Noun[edit]

norn f (genitive singular nornar, plural nornir)

  1. (Norse mythology) any of the three goddesses of fate or destiny.
Declension[edit]
f2 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative norn nornin nornir nornirnar
Accusative norn nornina nornir nornirnar
Dative norn nornini nornum nornunum
Genitive nornar nornarinnar norna nornanna
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English Norn or Scots Norn, from Norn, from Old Norse norrǿna.

Noun[edit]

norn n (genitive singular norns, uncountable)

  1. (language) Norn
Declension[edit]
Singular
Indefinite
Nominative norn
Accusative norn
Dative norni
Genitive norns

Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

norn f (genitive singular nornar, nominative plural nornir)

  1. witch (person who uses magic)

Declension[edit]