parley

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English parlai (speech, parley), borrowed from Old French parler (to talk; to speak), from Late Latin parabolō, from Latin parabola (comparison), from Ancient Greek παραβολή (parabolḗ), from παρά (pará, beside) with βολή (bolḗ, throwing). Doublet of palaver.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɑɹli/
  • (some non-rhotic accents) IPA(key): /ˈpɑːlɪ/

Noun[edit]

parley (countable and uncountable, plural parleys)

  1. A conference, especially one between enemies.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Dryden
      We yield on parley, but are stormed in vain.
    • 1920, Peter B. Kyne, The Understanding Heart, Chapter IV
      Without further parley Garland rode off up the hog's-back and the sheriff rode off down it []

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

parley (third-person singular simple present parleys, present participle parleying, simple past and past participle parleyed)

  1. (intransitive) To have a discussion, especially one between enemies.
    • 1638 Herbert, Sir Thomas Some years travels into divers parts of Asia and Afrique
      [] at day break we found the villaine, who, loath to parlee in fire and ſhot, fled amaine and left us []

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • parley” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

Anagrams[edit]